Georgia: New Kin Care Law; New Bill Protects On-Call Scheduling Practices

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All Employers with GA Employees

EFFECTIVE

July 1, 2017

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(888) 378-2456

Governor Nathan Deal recently signed two bills affecting employers of Georgia employees.  H.B. 243 is an employer-friendly bill addressing on-call scheduling practices, whereas S.B. 201 introduces kin care protections for employers that offer paid sick leave.  Both will become effective on July 1, 2017.

On-Call Scheduling. H.B. 243 bars local governments in Georgia from enacting regional ordinances that apply penalties or premium pay for on-call or predictive scheduling. Employers in Georgia will therefore retain the flexibility of having employees on-call without having to pay for shift changes, cancelled shifts, or lack of work.

Kin Care. Although the state of Georgia does not require employers to provide workers with paid sick leave, S.B. 201 introduces a new obligation for employers who voluntarily provide paid sick leave to their workforce. Specifically, employees must be permitted to use up to five days of paid sick leave each year to care for their immediate family. S.B. 201 does not cover employees who work fewer than 30 hours per week, or to small employers of fewer than 25 employees.

 Action Items

  1. Review H.B. 243 here and S.B. 201 here.
  2. Review handbooks and paid sick leave policy documents to include new kin care obligations.
  3. Subscribers can call our HR On-Call Hotline at (888) 378-2456 for further assistance.

Disclaimer: This document is designed to provide general information and guidance concerning employment-related issues. It is presented with the understanding that ManagEase is not engaged in rendering any legal opinions. If a legal opinion is needed, please contact the services of your own legal adviser.

© 2017 ManagEase, Incorporated.

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